Three Gardening Apps On Android

No matter whether you are a professional or just an amateur who has a fair bit of green patch in her backyard, gardening always gives you the kind of relaxation that no yoga or meditation ever can. Like everything else, there are Android apps to help you in your gardening as well. Listed below are three very useful Android apps that should help everyone – right from the gardning hobbyist to a pro.

Master Gardener Pocket Guide:

This is the app that is best suited for horticulture students or more generally to someone who is trying to learn the basics of gardening. The app contains a list of more than 675 gardening and horticulture related terms and concepts that you can learn through quizzes, flashcards and a dictionary. The app also includes hundreds of images that should provide a visual reference to the terms that makes learning much more simple. The ‘Master Gardener Pocket Guide’ is available for download at a price of $1.49. You can download the app by using the QR code below.


Garden Snob

If you are obsessed about gardening, as you should be if reading this post, this app is something you could consider. The app costs $1.5 and tells you everything right from the tips to keep your garden green to other landscaping tips like the right garden furniture to buy. You can purchase this app by using the code below.



Making A Rock Garden

Rock gardens are becoming increasingly popular across campuses and commercial establishments around the world as a form of landscaping. In the United Kingdom, there are a number of popular rock gardens such as the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburg and f Kew. Now if you are looking to build your own rock garden, the ‘Making a Rock Garden’ Android app should come handy. It has separate chapters that will teach you everything about picking a construction site, working on the construction, planting the garden, the plants you should choose for a rock garden and setting it up. The app is priced at $1.37 and can be downloaded by using the QR code below.

app2What are your favorite gardening related apps? Tell us in the comments.

Comparing online gaming between tablets and mobile phones

Online gaming has become one of the major applications of mobile phones and tablets. As PC sales decline sharply, those of tablets and smartphones skyrocket and today most owners of mobile devices favor using their tablets rather than their desktops for playing games.

The fundamental difference between the latest generations of tablets and mobile phones is that while tablets have larger displays phones are easier to carry around. Or at least that is the general consensus, though there are signs that it is changing.
If you think back to the times before we used to carry mobile computing devices on which we organizer our business and social lives, you might recall the Filofax. The Filofax was the first and possibly most prestigious of personal organizers  Generally leather bound, it was a six ring loose leaf binder in which people kept their diary, event organizers  contact lists, personal information, maps, and many other things that today are typically kept on a mobile phone. During the 1980s, when everyone was or alluded to being a yuppie, carrying around a Filofax was a sign that you had arrived; that you were one of the in-crowd. It has the same social status as owning an iPhone had when few people owned one.

The point is, the Filofax was typically the size of today’s tablet. And everyone carried one around. So, once we get accustomed to the size of tablets we will all start carrying those around too, and we will think nothing of doing so. Once this happens, and it almost certainly will, the tablet will replace the mobile phone as the primary online gaming device. We will use it for playing online casino games at a mobile casino like Lucky Nugget, for playing online games with our friends, and for playing huge online multiplayer games that are today mostly associated with gaming consoles

How Windows 8 Failed and Prevails

Microsoft’s Windows operating system has had its ups and downs over the years. Vista was, well, interesting. XP had a stable shelf life for a while there. Each new release seems to improve on earlier versions, but also tends to alter something people had become used to. Now, it’s time to look at Windows 8.


Perhaps the most stunning aspect of Windows 8, when compared to previous upgrades, is the cost. At $40 it is the least expensive operating system Microsoft has ever offered. You might be happy with your current version of Windows 7, but with a price that low, it’s tempting to buy a copy of 8 and consider trying it out when you get the chance.


If you’re a traditional desktop or laptop user, you might not find the upgrades to Windows 8 all that exciting. It incorporates what is called “Metro,” which is primarily a touch-centric interface. This has been useful on mobile devices, but if you’re a business user, you may not find this improvement particularly useful, or even desirable.

Sync to the Cloud

Windows 8’s ability to sync storage with online sources is vastly improved. It fully incorporates Microsoft’s Sky Drive into its file system, including all Office programs. This is a great convenience, particularly if you move from computer to computer. What’s more the settings can be made on one computer and all the others will automatically copy the personal touches you’ve put in place.

Changes to the Interface

Over the last 25 years, Microsoft has maintained a consistency with its older versions to ensure that users feel like they are using an upgrade with familiar continuity. This time, the change is radical and jarring. There is no Start menu, for example. Though the Start Screen serves the same function, it takes time to adjust to.

The New vs. the Old

The greatest concern with Windows 8 is the schizophrenic way things have to be run. It is much like Windows 3.1 where you had to open older programs in DOS and then switch between the two. There is a similar problem with this upgrade since the old Desktop apps don’t work in the new Windows 8 interface, and modern apps don’t work in the old desktop system.

A Single Paradigm for all Devices

Perhaps the most compelling aspect of the Windows 8 is the similarity it brings to all your Microsoft devices. There is finally a consistency between your PC, your tablet, even your phone. They all now work basically in the same way. They can even share the same settings. Transitioning from one device to the next will no longer be different. That even includes the Xbox, which has a Windows 8 sort of interface as well.

Like all new operating systems, Windows 8 has things you’ll appreciate and possibly things you’ll hate until you get used to them. Will it become as popular as Windows 7? That will depend, but it is definitely an attempt to move forward in the ever advancing world of computers.